6 Unusual Beaches You Won’t Believe Exist

From beaches made of glass to sand featuring every color of the rainbow, these coasts are way too beautiful to miss.

Scala dei Turchi

Resembling massive white stairs leading down to the ocean, the Scala dei Turchi (Stair of the Turks) is a tiered limestone beach cliff in southern Sicily. Located along the Realmonte coast, Scala dei Turchi only enhances an already gorgeous ocean view.

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Glass Beach

The phrase “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure” has never been truer than at the glass beaches of MacKerricher State Park near Fort Bragg, California. The beaches were used as garbage dumps for nearly 60 years before conservation efforts began in 1967. Today, three of the beaches are filled with polished pieces of colorful glass. The beaches are open to tourists, but collecting the glass is prohibited.

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Pink Sands Beach

 Miles of pink sand beaches stretch along the coast of Harbour Island in the Bahamas. The beaches get their color from red and pink shelled marine creatures called foraminifera that live in the coral reef off the island’s coast.

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Shell Beach

As its name implies, Shell Beach in the Shark Bay UNESCO World Heritage Site is made entirely of shells. One of the only beaches of this type in the world, it’s comprised of nearly 70 miles of cockle shells along the L’Haridon Bight bay in Western Australia.

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Benagil Sea Cave

 Accessible by boat, this sea cave in the Algarve region of Portugal hides a secluded beach. The area around Benagil Beach is full of limestone formations, but this renowned cave is the region’s trophy and every photographer’s dream.

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Giant’s Causeway

The studded beach known as Giant’s Causeway, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is made up of polygonal columns of basalt protruding from the coast and water. They were caused by a volcanic eruption 60 million years ago, but one local legend claims that the columns were carved by a giant named Finn McCool (hence the name).

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Call our free concierge service on 1800 908 254 and one of our travel experts will be happy to assist you with your booking!

W: http://www.TheR8.com

E: info@ther8.com

P: 1800 908 254

resource reference: cntraveller

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